Philippines

by Jessica Reyes-CantosChief of StaffRep. Del R. de Guzman, Lone District, Marikina city

The footwear industry should consider itself "lucky" for being o­ne of the few sectors where its products’ rate of duty remain unbound* under the current WTO rules. Except for ski boots which was the o­nly item in the footwear sector our "intelligent trade negotiators" submitted for binding at 50%, all other imported footwear can enjoy flexible tariff rates outside the tariff bindings submitted to the WTO. Indeed, submitting ski boots as the o­nly item with a bound tariff rate is a smart move, I would say, considering that the country does not produce ski boots and there is no domestic market for it. As such, importers can import all they want and we have promised not to slap a rate of duty higher than 50% for that item.

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By TambuyogDevelopmentCenter, September 2003

IN PRINCIPLE, fisheries production and trade should enhance resource sustainability and food security for fisher-producers, in accordance with the mandate of the 1987 Philippine Constitution and the 1998 Fisheries Code. The mere liberalization of fisheries trade does not guarantee either resource sustainability or food security, particularly food security based o­n self-sufficiency or self-reliance. On the contrary, it o­nly serves to worsen resource depletion and food insecurity, especially that of local communities that have traditionally used and depended o­n the now-heavily traded fishery and coastal resources.  

, fisheries production and trade should enhance resource sustainability and food security for fisher-producers, in accordance with the mandate of the 1987 Philippine Constitution and the 1998 Fisheries Code. The mere liberalization of fisheries trade does not guarantee either resource sustainability or food security, particularly food security based o­n self-sufficiency or self-reliance. On the contrary, it o­nly serves to worsen resource depletion and food insecurity, especially that of local communities that have traditionally used and depended o­n the now-heavily traded fishery and coastal resources.  

Official Stop the New Round! Coalition Statement, September 9, 2003

Stop the new WTO round! Caravan and SNR! Cancun monitor launched to defend Philippine interest in trade talks

On Wednesday, September 10, 10 a.m. in Cancun, Mexico (12 midnight Manila time), the Fifth Ministerial Conference of the World Trade Organization (WTO) formally opens for a five-day meeting to take stock of the progress of negotiations under the Work Programme adopted at the Fourth Ministerial Conference in Doha, Qatar in November 2001. The Cancun Ministerial is very critical. It puts o­n the table the framework within which to conclude negotiations for new agreements in agriculture, non-agriculture products, and services, as well as the framework to launch new negotiations o­n the new issues of investment, competition policy, government procurement, and trade facilitation.

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