#IndiaGraphicSeries on Agriculture and Food Security

Join Soni and Lucky in their journey across India as they search for tough answers on food security and explore the complexity of Indian agriculture. The graphic series is created by Orijit Sen, Vidyun Sabhaney and Harsho Mohan Chattoraj, and done in collaboration with Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung – South Asia

New updates every Monday and Wednesday, 19:00 India Time (GMT+05:30)

Chapter 1: Introducing Right to Food (Part 1) — 20 June 2022

Soni and Lucky are on a journey across India to find tough answers on the country’s food security and agriculture. Today, they are in  the state of Assam confronting the issue of #RighttoFood.

On one hot afternoon they stop in a village where they meet Uma who, despite being a cultivator herself, depends on the Public Distribution System for food. Uma explains that flooding due to unseasonal rain destroys their crop year on year. Her husband’s earning as a construction worker is not enough to feed their family of four.

Chapter 1: Introducing Right to Food (Part 2) — 22 June 2022

While Soni and Lucky learned about the harsh reality of the difficulty in access to food from Uma, Ayesha, an anganwadi worker, stops by and introduces them to the idea of #RighttoFood, and what it means to millions of Indians who struggle with hunger.

In 2021, the Global Hunger Index ranked India at 101 out of 116 countries. This identified India as a country with one of the highest levels of under-nutrition in the world. 

Chapter 2: Hunger and Under-Nutrition in India (Part 1) — 27 June 2022

Still in  Assam, Ayesha, the anganwadi worker, takes Soni and Lucky through the staggering number of people who struggle with hunger and malnutrition in India. In 2021, 3 out of 10 children in India were stunted, a condition brought about by chronic undernutrition.

 

Chapter 2: Hunger and Under-Nutrition in India (Part 2) — 29 June 2022

After learning from Ayesha about the staggering number of people who struggle with hunger and malnutrition in India, Uma also shares the shocking fact that most small farmers in her village don’t have enough to eat. The question is why?