Publications

  • Contents:Whose growth? Whose democracy? by Clarissa Militante

    Voices from the countryside:Farmers speak of agrarian reform strugglesby Mary Ann Manahan

    APECO's story: two visions of development contend in land grab caseby Jerik Cruz

    Photos: Agrarian Reform Campaign and Consultations; FOCUS in Rio 20+ Meeting; FOCUS at the Asia-Europe Peoples' Forum 9, in Ventiane Laos

    Defending water justice and democracy in Asia: alternatives to commercialization and privitizationby Mary Ann Manahan, Buenaventura Dargantes, Cheryl Batistel

  • The Link between Emission Cuts, Right to Development and Transformation of Capitalist System

    Humanity is running out of time. If there are no deep and real cuts in the next five years the impacts of climate change will lead to a situation ten times worse than what we have seen with hurricane Sandy and other climate change related events in India, Russia, Philippines and Africa in this past year.

    That's what happens with 0.8ºC of global warming, and the current climate negotiations are leading us to a 4ºC to 8ºC scenario.

  • Since first being announced a decade ago, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) has been heralded as a revolutionary solution to corruption and related difficulties that extractive industries bring to developing countries.

  • This paper discusses the world’s first-ever political risk insurance policy for a forest carbon offset project, provided by the U.S. Government’s development finance agency, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). This project aims to protect 64,318 hectares of forests in Oddar Meanchey Province, in Northwest Cambodia. The paper presents the concept of OPIC's political risk insurance and describes the agency’s past and current developmental and environmental financing practices.

  • IN THIS ISSUE: WHAT IS THIS THING CALLED “GREEN ECONOMY” 

    Twenty years after the 1992 Earth Summit, the Earth is in a sorry state.

  • Our analysis, and that of many communities and organisations across Asia, is that the CDM is an extension of the generalised approach to big project and energy intensive development that has systematically marginalised indigenous peoples and local communities and over- exploited the Earth. The “clean development mechanism” is, quite simply, a mechanism that allows polluters to avoid binding emissions reductions in one location, while shifting emissions to another location.

  • Climate finance is a key element of a global agreement to address the impacts of climate change. Billions of dollars will flow to developing countries and it is essential that this money goes to meeting the needs of those most vulnerable to these devastating impacts and is not lost to corruption and poor governance. It is also important to recognise that the amounts of funding, the number

  • Our Vision for 2012-2014

    The emblematic centrepiece of Focus work will be Whose New Asia? Understanding the political, economic, social and ecological challenges of the New Asia; building resistances, alternatives and solidarity

  • This paper is an attempt to collate and integrate field experiences, on-the-ground consultations and published materials from official and alternative sources that delved into: 1) the possibility of having “water for all” (for human use)—from source to tap, and; 2) the initiatives and activities that have been undertaken to achieve this. It offers recommendations and options for policy reforms and developmental initiatives in the management of water service delivery.

Pages