Publications

Essay collection presented by the Reclaiming Public Water Network
November 2007

The Focus Annual Report 2006 has just been released.

'At the Door of all the East': The Philippines in United States Military Strategy

This report seeks to document and explain why and how the United States has been attempting to re-establish its military presence in the Philippines in the period beginning in 2001. Diverging from the common explanation attributing increased US military presence in the country to the so-called “global war on terror,” this report instead locates US actions in the Philippines and in the Asia-Pacific region in the larger context of the US’ objectives and strategy.

The self-avowed aim of the US is to perpetuate its position of being the world’s sole superpower in order to re-order the world. Its strategy to perpetuate its status is to prevent the rise of any rivals.  To do this, it is seeking the capacity to deter and defeat potential enemies anywhere in the world by retaining and realigning  its “global posture” or its ability to operate across the globe through its worldwide network of forward-deployed troops, bases, andaccess agreements. Today, the US believes that, of all its potential rivals, China poses the greatest threat and must therefore be contained before it becomes even more powerful.

Introduction

 
Three-quarters of the world’s 852 million men and women suffering from hunger are found in rural areas and depend on agriculture for their survival. Most of them are landless farmers or have such tiny or unproductive plots of land that they cannot feed their families”. This was the assessment of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) released at the second International Conference on Agrarian Reform and Rural Development in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in March 2006.

A report for Focus on the Global South by Isabelle Delforge

From small farms to fast food chains and supermarkets

The fast food retailer Kentucky Fried Chicken requires chickens that weigh exactly two kilograms in order to fit the size of the portions. Some segments of the Japanese market want okra with 5 ridges on the fruit while others require 7 ridges. Baby corn exported to Europe and Japan must be between 4 to 7 cm long. On the global food market, varieties, shapes and colours are now increasingly standardised and food safety regulations are becoming extremely strict.

Contents
Building Community: The Search for Alternative Regionalism in Southeast Asia 1
Jenina Joy Chavez
Neo-liberalism and the Working People of Southeast Asia
Rene Ofreneo
China and Southeast Asia: Emerging Problems in an Economic Relation
Walden Bello
Welcome China!: China’s Rise and its Increasing Role in ASEAN
Dorothy Guerrero
Development and Plunder in the Mekong Region
Shalmali Guttal