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Agriculture has been the driving force for India’s economy. At one point farming was even considered to be one of the most respectable job an individual could have. However, with the shift from zero budget farming to the rapid commercialisation of agriculture, many farmers have found themselves displaced or stuck in a vicious circle of debt trap.

 CONTRACT FARMING AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON SMALL SCALE FARMING IN INDIA

In developing country like India, where more than half of its 1.23 billion population is dependent on subsistence farming, both ‘Kisan’ (Farmer) and ‘Krishi’ (Agriculture) become vital constituents of the political economy of the country. Woven around these two unavoidable constituents are the conditions of food security and livelihood, which determine the survival of a vast majority of the country’s population.

Across Asia, we are seeing the repression, denial, abuse and violation of rights of peoples and communities through criminalization, intimidation, disappearances, violence, and even murder. 

As we enter this discussion, it is important to ask who are the targets of criminalization and violence, what spaces are shrinking, and for whom spaces are shrinking.  Not all civil society actors are affected in the same way.

According to data compiled by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), enough food is produced in the world to feed everyone and yet, over 800 million people suffer from hunger, 60 % of who are women (). The 2017 report on The State of Food Insecurity and Nutrition in the World shows that world hunger is rising and the estimated number of undernourished people has increased from 777 million in 2015 to 815 million in 2016.

On the day of his birthday, 17th September, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi inaugurated the Sardar Sarovar Dam, and dedicated this act to the nation. The dam - the second largest in the world - will submerge vast areas of land, displacing thousands of people as a result.

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