Publications

  • Highlights:

    • Marked the 20th anniversary of Focus on the Global South with a two-day International Conference on Peoples’ Struggles and Alternatives - over 120 people attended, representing almost 80 organisations from 20 different countries

    • Joined mass mobilisations in Paris and released our analysis on climate justice to show the importance of social movements in taking action on climate change

    • Joined the mobilisations in Nairobi during the 10th WTO ministerial to relay civil society demands during international trade negotiations

  • Humanity and Nature Cover Image

    An economy is often defined as "the wealth and resources of a country or region". Few would contest that the greatest wealth and most fundamental resource for humanity is the earth on which we live; yet most do not see our environment as an economy in itself.  Conversely, nearly all contemporary economic and development models see the natural economy as a resource to be exploited (or at best managed) to serve the needs of the monetized economy.

  • Since the early 1990s, Cambodia has been heavily reliant on foreign aid. The Cambodian Government is seeking to reduce donor-dependence and increase self-reliance, aiming to lift the country to the status of higher middle-income country by 2030. This goal depends heavily on increasing private investment, and the Government has described the private sector as the “engine of economic growth” for Cambodia. It is therefore seeking to encourage both foreign and domestic investment in order to maintain current growth rates and facilitate continued development of the country. 

  • In the last decade, the resource-rich Philippines has bet heavily on the mining industry as a development strategy, an approach that has come under growing scrutiny. With 47 large-scale mines in operation and growing evidence of their social and environmental costs, all the presidential candidates in May 2016 election were forced to explain their position on, and their financial ties to, the extractive industry. Most candidates, including President-elect Rodrigo Duterte, argued for “responsible mining” and an end to “exploitative contracts”.

  • In February 2015, the UN’s Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, Dr. Hilal Elver, visited the Philippines and met with government agencies as well as civil society organizations and social movement groups representing the marginalized sectors of the country. This report documents the meeting between her and these organizations during which the latter presented a 9-point agenda for the fulfillment of the right to food.

  • Here is the latest Focus on the Global South newsletter tackling the most important issues in COP 21, and beyond.

  • 20 November 2015 

    We all want action on climate change, but what does that action mean? Will it be effective, will it be fair, and are the Paris climate talks going to deliver that action?

  • Focus Policy Review cover

    28 August 2015

    Issues or problems associated with land have become more multi-layered in the 21st century.  In particular in the Philippine setting, a number of “pro-poor” land laws were enacted after the Marcos dictatorship. These laws were products of social movements’ struggles and mass movement assertions on land rights in a democratic set-up. The 1987 Constitution has a very strong social justice component, which recognizes the rights of farmers/peasants to land, of fisherfolk to traditional fishing ground, and of indigenous peoples (IPs) to ancestral lands.

  • Climate Change and Agroecology

    What exactly is the climate change crisis? How does it affect us? Are we causing it? How? How is it going to affecting our land, water, food and lifestyle? Can we anything about it? How? Why is the practice of agroecology so important in addition to clean energy? 

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