The Commons

Statement from Focus on the Global South, International Rivers, Mekong Watch, CEE Bankwatch Network, NGO Forum on ADB and Both ENDS

Amsterdam/Bangkok/Manila/Prague/Tokyo - Non-governmental organizations are calling on the World Bank, Asian Development Bank (ADB) and European Investment Bank (EIB) to publicly acknowledge the millions of dollars of failed investment in their flagship project, Nam Theun 2. This 1070 MW dam has failed to bring intended development benefits, and instead has unleashed a range of negative impacts on the affected populations in central Laos.

While it is true that CARP/ER has loopholes that have been creating problems for the law’s implementation and allowed landowners to escape its provisions, the social justice program has also paved the way for reversing the impoverished plight and powerlessness of farmers and their communities. Though stories of farmer-beneficiaries still await successful endings, those that have been given entitlements to the lands they have long worked on have gotten a new lease on life and a better future to look forward to.

As we commemorate the World Water Day on March 22, Focus on the Global South and its allies just released a statement today:

We commemorate World Water Day 2015 by celebrating the struggles and victories of the global water justice movements. These achievements are a testament to the strength of our ties of solidarity and the resolve of communities to protect watersheds and maintain control over water services.

16th February 2015 

 

Office of the Permanent Secretary, Prime Minister Office

Government House, 1 Pissanulok Road

Dusit, Bangkok 10300, Thailand

 

Subject: Murder of Mr. Chai Bunthonglek in Klong Sai Pattana, Suranthhani Province, Thailand

His Excellency General Prayuth Cha-o-cha, Prime Minister of Thailand

Bachieng, Laos - photo by Shalmali Guttal

In 2011, Olivier de Schutter, then UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food cautioned, “The commodification of land, which the global phenomenon of land-grabbing is accelerating, entails risks that go far beyond what the current proposals for regulating it seem willing to recognize.” The risks he alluded to stem from treating land, labour and money as mere tradable commodities and allowing market mechanisms to be the sole arbiter of society, culture and nature.

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